Strange Night Story part 1

25 Color photographs, Lamda print on paper, 101.7 x 76.2 cm.

 

 

Interview with Adeline Ooi, curator of CUT: New Photography From Southeast Asia, 2008

 

Why do you choose to work with photography? Is this the only medium you work with?


It’s a coincidence that I use photography as a medium.  Actually, my interest began with “images” that we see everyday and our perceptions, which are a crucial part of our cognitive process.  Once I became involved with the photographic process and cycle, I became certain this was the means that I must use to express the subjects I’m interested in.

In my life the relationship between contemporary media and thought intertwines with its opposite - elements that deal with conservative ideas, beliefs and faiths. Taking this position, as an observer, creates a middle ground which can reveal cultural patterns of repetitions and differences.

I focus my interest to expressing thoughts through “time and images”, so the work is not limited by the physical aspect of the photographic process. We are relying on time and space, so the images need to be considered also in light of the photographic ideas.

I am open to other means of presentation that can connect and blend the subjects that I am interested in.

What does the photograph mean in the 21st century?


Desire. Memory. Remembrance. Cultural reproduction. Idea opposition. Social interaction. Situation vagueness. Violent expression.  Control.  Control rejection.

What are the prevailing themes in your work?


Life perceptions, resulting feelings, realistic illusion, virtual myths, tiny spots in memories and small corners in current situations from one individual’s life that can extend themselves into the mainstream.
 

How did you come to make this particular work/series of work?


“The strange night story part 1” originates from the atmosphere and space that surround urban people.  These places and spaces are like living backgrounds reflecting the feelings and emotions of those who are defined by situations, surprises, vagueness and resistance on a day-to-day basis.  In the moments that no one seems to be awake, fear and anxiety manifest themselves ever so clearly.  From those seemingly mysterious places, questions arise.  It’s as if something has already happened inside.  It reminds us of other traces and feelings surfacing when we pass such places.  Memories are connected.  The connections between old feelings with the same moments and the same space occur.  The production design was not planned down to the minute for it revolved around impromptu situations.

 

 

List of exhibitions

2018  - Part 3, https://www.kornkritwork.com/strange-night-story

2011   - Part 2, Bangkok Density, Biagiotti Gallery, Florence

2008 - Part 1, CUT: New Photography From Southeast Asia, Valentine Willie Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur       

         - Part 1, CUT2: New Photography from Southeast Asia, Valentine Willie Fine Art, Singapore

2006 - Part 1, A Ghost Story, Center of Academic Resources Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok

 

 

Strange Night Story part 2

Gold dust on 41 digital prints, printed text and hand writing text on papers pin on plywood panel, size variable

 

Bangkok Density, 2011, Biagiotti Gallery, Florence
Curator: Pier Luggi Tazzi

 

 

The installation features 41 photographs of varying dimensions pinned onto plywood panels. Kornkrit leads the viewer through a forensic reconstruction of a mysterious and ultimately unresolved event. Scattered among the pictures are typed excerpts from the collection of Arabic fables One Thousand and One Nights, in which Persian queen Scheherazade, to distract her angry husband from murdering her, recounts tales tinged with suspense, eventually winning back his love. Open to tangential narratives, the text-and-image installation mirrors One Thousand and One Nights, in which a main story leads to myriad smaller tales, Some pictures, such as a smashed glass or a twisted spoon, suggest clues. Others, toned with gold dust, capture the beauty of empty gardens at night. Besides its aesthetic appeal, Kornkrit’s installation powerfully visualizes the impossibility of imposing a unified narrative on Bangkok’s complicated social reality.
text from Bangkok Density, an article by Alessandra Alliata Nobili, Artasiapacific magazine issue 76, Nov/Dec 2011

 

 

Strange Night Story part 3

Remixed Reality